Call Us Today (207) 729-0202

Don's Redemption Center

48 Cushing Brunswick, ME 04011


donaldtorrey@rocketmail.com

Don's Redemption, Inc. Expanded to a Second Location:
The Beverage Rack 48 Cushing Street Brunswick, ME.

Please Visit Our New Location!

Don's
Redemption Center

The Beverage Rack
Redemption Center

(207) 729-8825 (207) 729-0202
51 Harpswell Rd Brunswick, ME  48 Cushing Street Brunswick, ME 

Hours:
Tuesday-Friday: 9:00AM-4:00PM
Saturday: 9:00AM-1:00PM
Closed: Sunday & Monday

Hours:
Monday-Friday: 9:00AM-4:00PM
Saturday: 9:00AM-2:00PM
Closed: Sunday 

We are one of mid-coast Maine's premier Redemption Centers. We are a family owned business since 1995 that process all of your returnable bottle, can & plastic containers Tues-Fri 9 - 4:00, Sat & Sun 9 - 1:00. We will pick-up large amounts of your recyclable beverage containers by request. We welcome bottle drive products! The process of collecting and re-manufacturing recyclable materials, outlined here, is only part of recycling. Buying and using a recycled product completes the circle. Look for the recycled label on the products you buy, and ask your store manager to stock recycled products and products made of recycled materials.

  • More than 2.4 billion pounds of plastic bottles were recycled in 2008. Although the amount of plastic bottles recycled in the U.S. has grown every year since 1990, the actual recycling rate remains steady at around 27 percent.


15 Plastic bottles and wide-mouth containers are constantly around us, from your bathroom cabinet to every fast food joint in town. They are also a valuable part of most U.S. communities’ recycling stream as PET (#1) and HDPE (#2) make up 96 percent of all plastic bottles produced in the U.S. The first PET bottle was recycled in 1977. Since then, plastic bottle recycling has increased to more than 2.4 billion pounds annually. Today, more than 80 percent of communities collect plastic bottles while nearly 30 percent of the 100 largest U.S. cities collected wide mouth plastic containers for recycling in 2007.

Top 10 Reasons to Recycle Plastic Bottles

1. Shed some light on the issue.
Recycling a single plastic bottle can conserve enough energy to light a 60-watt light bulb for up to six hours.

2. It’s a growing demand.
According to the EPA, the amount of plastics generation in municipal solid waste has increased from less than 1 percent in 1960 to 12.1 percent in 2007.

3. Get a creative boost.
Recycled plastic bottles can be made into products such as clothing, carpeting, detergent bottles and lumber for outdoor decking.

4. Walk it out.
More than 80 percent of U.S. households have access to a plastics recycling program, be it curbside or community drop-off centers.

5. Get on the bandwagon.
In recent years, the number of U.S. plastics recycling business has nearly tripled. More than 1,600 businesses are involved in recycling post-consumer plastics.

6. Make room.
Recycling one ton of plastic saves 7.4 cubic yards of landfill space.

7. It’s getting hotter.
Recycling one pound of PET plastic bottles saves approximately 12,000 BTUs (British thermal unit) of heat energy.

8. Reduce the use.
Producing new plastic products from recycled materials uses two-thirds less energy than is required to make products from raw (virgin) materials. It also reduces greenhouse gas emissions.

9. Salvage what’s left.
According to the EPA, while overall recovery of plastics for recycling is relatively small – 2.1 million – recovery of some plastic containers has reached higher levels. PET soft drink bottles were recovered at a rate of 37 percent in 2007. Recovery of HDPE milk and water bottles was estimated at about 28 percent in 2007.

10. Push it forward.
Plastics are a rapidly growing segment of the municipal solid waste stream. The largest category of plastics are found in containers and packaging (e.g., soft drink bottles, lids, shampoo bottles).

Facts About Plastic Bottles

It’s a hot summer day, and you’re enjoying a nice, cool bottle of water. As you walk through your local park, you reach out and throw your empty bottle into the trash can. So, what are the repercussions of these actions?

  • 16 Americans buy an estimated 29.8 billion plastic water bottles every year.
  • Nearly eight out of every 10 bottles will end up in a landfill.
  • It is estimated that the production of plastics accounts for 4 percent of the energy consumption in the U.S.
  • HDPE and PET bottles showed the highest recycling rates of any plastic bottles types, at 27.1 and 23.1 percent, respectively.
  • Less than 1 percent of all plastics are recycled. Therefore, almost all plastics are incinerated or end up in a landfill.
  • Recycling a single plastic bottle can conserve enough energy to light a 60-watt light bulb for up to six hours.
  • Recycled plastic bottles can be made into products such as clothing, carpeting, detergent bottles and lumber for outdoor decking.
  • More than 80 percent of U.S. households have access to a plastics recycling program through curbside or community drop-off centers.


Producing new plastic products from recycled materials uses two-thirds less energy than required to make products from raw (virgin) materials. It also reduces greenhouse gas emissions.

Facts About Aluminum Recycling

17

  • Discovered in the 1820s, aluminum is the most abundant metal on earth.
  • More than 50 percent of the aluminum cans produced is recycled.
  • A used aluminum can is recycled and back on the grocery shelf as a new can in as little as 60 days.
  • Aluminum is a durable and sustainable metal: Two-thirds of the aluminum ever produced is still in use today.
  • Every minute, an average of 113,204 aluminum cans is recycled.
  • Making new aluminum cans from used cans takes 95 percent less energy than using virgin materials.
  • Twenty recycled cans can be made with the energy needed to produce one can using virgin ore.
  • Recycling one aluminum can saves enough energy to keep a 100-watt bulb burning for almost four hours or run your television for three hours.
  • Tossing away an aluminum can wastes as much energy as pouring out half of that can’s volume of gasoline.
  • In 1972, 1 pound of aluminum cans was equivalent to about 22 empty cans. Due to advanced technology using less material and increasing the durability of aluminum cans, as of 2002, 1 pound of aluminum cans is equivalent to about 34 empty cans.
  • The average employee consumes 2.5 beverages each day while at work.
  • An empty aluminum can is worth about one cent.


Products & Services

Bottle redemption and the beverage rack is a convenience store too selling wine and beer. Bottle Recycling center -Call for prices. We are one of mid-coast Maine's largest Redemption Centers. We process all of your returnable bottle, can & plastic containers. Tues-Fri 9 - 4:00 and Sat and Sun 9 - 1:00. We will pick-up large amounts of your recyclable beverage containers by request. We welcome bottle drive products.






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Areas Served

  • Alna
  • Arrowsic
  • Ashdale
  • Back Narrows
  • Bailey Island
  • Bath
  • Boothbay Harbor
  • Bowdoinham
  • Bremen
  • Bristol
  • Brunswick
  • Brunswick Nas
  • Cathance
  • Chamberlain
  • Damariscotta
  • Damariscotta Mills
  • Dover
  • Dresden
  • East Boothbay
  • Edgecomb
  • Georgetown
  • Growstown
  • Harding
  • Harpswell
  • Harpswell Sound
  • Harrington Corner
  • Harwards
  • Hatch'S Corner
  • Head Tide
  • Hockomock Bay
  • Johns Bay
  • Maquoit Bay
  • Meadowbrook
  • Merepoint
  • Middle Bay
  • Montsweag Bay
  • Muscongus
  • Nequasset
  • New Harbor
  • Newagan
  • Newcastle
  • North Newcastle
  • Ocean Point
  • Orrs Island
  • Parker Head
  • Pemaquid
  • Pemaquid Point
  • Perry Cove
  • Phippsburg
  • Quahog Bay
  • Richmond
  • Robinhood
  • Round Pond
  • Sheepscott
  • South Bristol
  • South Harpswell
  • South Newcastle
  • Southport
  • Spruce Shores
  • Squirrel Island
  • Topsham
  • Trevett
  • Turners Corner
  • Walpole
  • West Bath
  • West Dresden
  • West Harpswell
  • West Southport
  • Westport Island
  • Wiscasset
  • Woolwich

Established: 1995